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TOPIC: The perfect combination of toothy and polished

The perfect combination of toothy and polished 1 year 1 week ago #10482

  • TjJohnson
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Hello everyone, I'm trying to figure out an answer to the 'perfect' combination of a polished edge and a toothy edge that has a nice bite. The goal is to have a knife that will for example bite into rope (tougher tasks) while still being able to have the ability to do more fine tasks that require a polished edge. I took my Benchmade mini Onlsaught 764 (154CM0 and sharpened it at 17 degrees per side, finishing with 1,600 grit ceramics then 2,000 grit sandpaper, then 5 and 3.5 balsa diamond pasted strops. I then micro beveled at 23 degrees per side for strength (same progression starting at 1,600 ceramics. Then made angles at 22 (all from 2,000 grit sandpaper taped to ceramics, then stropped at that angle for the polish), 21 degrees, 20 degrees, 19 degrees, then 18. Blended them all together so I had a 18-23 degree convex. I did an additional sandpapering at 17 and 16 per side to help blend it into the full flat grind.

The knife was then taken off of the Wicked Edge and stropped on Stropmans green compound (estimated .50 microns) then his red compound, (estimated .125 microns). FINALLY when I finished the knife was mirror-like, but not perfect. It whittled hair nicely just as it should. I went to cut some paracord to see how it would perform and though it will easily push through it, the cord would slick along the length of the edge. This was extremely sharp but not aggressive enough though you could feel the 'grab' when you felt the edge with your finger.

My questions are, where do you think lies the perfect balance of teeth and polish? Would it be better to sharpen to 1,600 ceramics and jump straight to red compound? Or finish on 1,000 grit and start at black then white compound? (Around 6 and 2.5 microns). What are your thoughts/experiences? I will in the end establish this edge at the micro bevel and polish the back bevels. This applies to EDC and hard use blades if you will.

Thanks for any information guys. Hopefully girls too ;)

-Tj
-Tj
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Re: The perfect combination of toothy and polished 1 year 1 week ago #10497

  • ApexGS
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For heavy duty EDC use I've always considered 1000 grit diamond to be my personal gold standard, and it seems like a few folks agree with that so I must be on to something :)

I rarely polish knives out beyond 1000 grit, and most of my stropping on the WEPS is just to clean up and bring out a little extra sharpness. My last 154CM blade was a Hogue, which I kept at 1000 grit straight off the stones and used for everything from cutting through defunct appliance power cords to chopping down saplings around the farm.
Your friendly neighborhood gunsmith!
- Tom
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Re: The perfect combination of toothy and polished 1 year 1 week ago #10500

  • razoredgeknives
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ApexGS wrote:
For heavy duty EDC use I've always considered 1000 grit diamond to be my personal gold standard, and it seems like a few folks agree with that so I must be on to something :)

I rarely polish knives out beyond 1000 grit, and most of my stropping on the WEPS is just to clean up and bring out a little extra sharpness. My last 154CM blade was a Hogue, which I kept at 1000 grit straight off the stones and used for everything from cutting through defunct appliance power cords to chopping down saplings around the farm.

I couldn't agree more Tom! That is one of the finest EDC edges around in my opinion...

Tj, in my opinion the perfect answer to your question is found in a micro-bevel (preferably with the 1k diamond). Let us know how it goes!
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Re: The perfect combination of toothy and polished 1 year 1 week ago #10501

  • jendeindustries
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This is an interesting topic that often gets heated in the kitchen knife world!

The perfect marriage of tooth and polish is always subjective, but here's my take:

Toothy edges are caused by coarser grits and produce a better "ripping" edge, while polished edges are formed by finer grits, and produce better "slicing" abilities.

Most production EDC knives are factory sharp to about 220 grit and then buffed with some sort of fine compound. This leaves a toothy edge that cuts into everything, caused by the 220 grit scratches, but the fine compound "polishes the grooves" to give it that smoother slicing ability.

What Tj did was to essentially establish very fine scratches at the edge, which makes it more a slicing edge, and the reason it didn't seem to grab onto what it was cutting.

What's best? Well that depends, of course. Since it seems you want a little more bite, I would keep the 1600 WEPS and then skip to the 3.5 micron diamond on balsa. (which diamond product are you using - WEPS paste or Ken Schwartz spray? that makes a difference). Your might not have the mirror, but you will have the smoothness of the 3.5 micron combined with some tooth from the 1600
Tom Blodgett
Jende Industries, LLC

My Blog: jendeindustries.wordpress.com
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Re: The perfect combination of toothy and polished 1 year 6 days ago #10509

  • cbwx34
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Welcome to the forum! :) Great question... no simple answer (although you got some good ones already). My .02... experiment with what you have, and find what works best for your needs. That's the beauty of sharpening your own knives. You might consider eliminating the stropping with the Stropman, if you're looking for an edge with more bite.

Let us know what you come up with!
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Re: The perfect combination of toothy and polished 1 year 6 days ago #10512

  • mark76
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Welcome Tj!

As Tom said, it's really subjective, but this is what I do. I sharpen a blade up to a level that it can still withstand slight mistreatment with a 1K diamond stone. This seems to be for me 10K Chosera's followed by some stropping. Then I do only a FEW (say, 3) light passes with the 1K diamond stone.
Last Edit: 1 year 6 days ago by mark76.
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