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TOPIC: Leading or Trailing Strokes

Re: Leading or Trailing Strokes 1 year 6 months ago #8129

  • PhilipPasteur
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Nice illustrations...and I have seen the post where you put it up originally. I still don't follow it or see how you get your three examples. Maybe you can explain.

In any case, when using the WEPS... or even bench stones, I can't say that I have seen anything... via edge perfomance nor micrographs to allow me to buy into your theory. I do have several bench stones that I can't use edge leading, but obviously (to me) do produce significant edge refinement when used edge trailing. No "burnana-peel" or false burrs, that I can detect.

Would like to hear more explanation from you... and more hard evidence with Clay's tests and photos.

Phil
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Re: Leading or Trailing Strokes 1 year 6 months ago #8133

  • BluntCut
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PhilipPasteur wrote:
Nice illustrations...and I have seen the post where you put it up originally. I still don't follow it or see how you get your three examples. Maybe you can explain.

In any case, when using the WEPS... or even bench stones, I can't say that I have seen anything... via edge perfomance nor micrographs to allow me to buy into your theory. I do have several bench stones that I can't use edge leading, but obviously (to me) do produce significant edge refinement when used edge trailing. No "burnana-peel" or false burrs, that I can detect.

Would like to hear more explanation from you... and more hard evidence with Clay's tests and photos.

Phil

Envision an edge cross section (a geometrical 2D triangle, where the area is the blade edge):
* Steel S requires force N to penetrate surface 1 molecule deep by an abrading fixed-plane abrasive. Lateral tensile strenght (bending) per molecular line is 0.2N.
* Start with a molecule thick apex.
* Abrading Vectors (Avt & Avl) for Edge Trail & Lead.

Burr form at the bend because the abrasive no longer able to penetrate the upward bent surface. If the sharpen stroke is super slow, so Av is mostly normal/perpendicular pressure to the surface. Then in this case, neither Trailing or Leading can create an apex thinner than 5 molecules thick.

Using this envisioned model to add more details to my Prev post:

ex1: 'how come the burr seem long but blade height wasn't shorten by the same amount?'
If start out with a flat-top edge, as abrading material reach the flat edge and thickness is less than the tensile/bend strength, these material will hinge/flop over the flat-top. Now you've the burr but far from apexed. Many beginers ran into this by feel the burr alone without looking at the edge reflection.

ex2: 'raised burr 2 sides, deburred but didn't apexed?'
ex1 applied to both side of bevel face

ex3: lip
Whenever Av N exceed tensile strength in area below apex, thus kept abrade more and more below where sufficient thickness to support abrasion. This problems are more applicable for advanced sharpeners.

Again, my posts don't addressed the complete complexity picture of steel+abrasive+interaction characteristics. I merely focused simplistic edge lead or trail abrading interaction.
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