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TOPIC: New customer from the farmers market.

New customer from the farmers market. 11 months 2 weeks ago #13384

  • JedBowen
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Thanks Curtis for trying out the quick method and posting your results.

I am glad that it has also turned out a sharp and good looking blade for you as well. It is what I have to do at the market to make a profit and sharpen a couple of the customers knives while the make their lap around the market. I have done a couple of knives to the WE perfect edge and mirror polish but around here those are few and far between with the exception for my knife collection. Most of my knives come to me at the sad point in their lives so the 50 or 80 grit is needed. Some have been done to a very acute angle and the 100 grit works fine on them. So yes not all knives need that aggressive of grits. I am just happy with the results you came out with.
Thanks again Curtis
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New customer from the farmers market. 11 months 2 weeks ago #13385

  • razoredgeknives
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This is great info guys! Thanks for posting your results! I will have to measure my time now =) However, I think I will stop at 600x then strop about 10 passes per side... I finish my edc at 600 grit w/ no strop and it works great... still shaves too ;)
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New customer from the farmers market. 11 months 2 weeks ago #13390

  • cds43016
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This is an interesting discussion. I usually use a belt sander when I just want to get the job done quickly. But 6+ minutes on the WEPS is impressive on a very dull knife. I think if you had to do a lot of knives at one time, a belt sander may still be quicker. But 6+ minutes is not bad at all.

Setting up a knife on the WEPS has always been time consuming. Finding the sweet spot and angle can take more than 6 minutes itself. Having a fixed setting for the angle and estimating the sweet spot based on experience can sure save a lot of time. The result for most knives would be good enough. Speed is important for someone sharping for a fee and for most customers the definition of a good job an undamaged knife that is sharp.

I tried going for speed but have not gotten the same results yet. I need enlightened. When do you go for the burr? Do you get it at the 50/80 stones or just get it real close and achieve it with the 100? I know from other posts it was not recommended to get a burr with the 50/80 stones but it would seem at the speed you are going are you may be doing just that. I know a polished edge is not your goal.

Also with the other stones from 100 on, how many strokes do you use per grit? It can’t be very many.

A lot of this is contrary of the normal way I have used the WEPS in the past. Mirror and hair splitting edges are the norm. But for most people even what I can achieve with a belt sander is good enough for many knives. It seems at 6+ minutes the same can be gotten on the WEPS without the requirement for electricity.
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New customer from the farmers market. 11 months 2 weeks ago #13391

  • cbwx34
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cds43016 wrote:
This is an interesting discussion. I usually use a belt sander when I just want to get the job done quickly. But 6+ minutes on the WEPS is impressive on a very dull knife. I think if you had to do a lot of knives at one time, a belt sander may still be quicker. But 6+ minutes is not bad at all.

Setting up a knife on the WEPS has always been time consuming. Finding the sweet spot and angle can take more than 6 minutes itself. Having a fixed setting for the angle and estimating the sweet spot based on experience can sure save a lot of time. The result for most knives would be good enough. Speed is important for someone sharping for a fee and for most customers the definition of a good job an undamaged knife that is sharp.

If you look at the database (or probably your own notes if you keep them), most knives are set around A.5-B, so setting most knives in that area should work.

I tried going for speed but have not gotten the same results yet. I need enlightened. When do you go for the burr? Do you get it at the 50/80 stones or just get it real close and achieve it with the 100? I know from other posts it was not recommended to get a burr with the 50/80 stones but it would seem at the speed you are going are you may be doing just that. I know a polished edge is not your goal.

I don't check for a burr, what I do is feel the edge (lightly of course) before I start, then as I go. (Sort of a WE version of the 3 finger test). Using the coarse stone and angle hits the edge rather quickly, and you can feel the difference.

Also with the other stones from 100 on, how many strokes do you use per grit? It can’t be very many.

It's not... probably a bit more on the 100 than the rest, but it goes quick. You can usually hear and feel a difference as the stone reaches it "limit" and move on to the next stone. Can't really say how many strokes.. but since this is more of a "sharpening for time" test... i'd base it on that... and only spend 30 sec. to a minute, then move on, and see what your results look and cut like at the end.

A lot of this is contrary of the normal way I have used the WEPS in the past. Mirror and hair splitting edges are the norm. But for most people even what I can achieve with a belt sander is good enough for many knives. It seems at 6+ minutes the same can be gotten on the WEPS without the requirement for electricity.

Contrary to me too... especially using the 80g in this manner. Like you stated earlier, not really the norm. My initial thought when I saw 80g at 25 deg. was, Holy #$%^&, that seems a bit much. But after trying it, I found it to not be as bad as I thought, and the progression cleans up the edge rather nicely, and leaves a good edge.

Like Jed stated, it's not totally a blanket approach... you can still look at a knife, evaluate it, and make adjustments accordingly. But for example, the volume and type of knives Tuffy's getting... this could be a good approach.

I'd pick a knife that you can dull and resharpen a couple of times, and give it a try.
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New customer from the farmers market. 11 months 2 weeks ago #13392

  • LeoBarr
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One thing to consider is that the effective sharpness of an edge it the thickness of that edge - "Razor blades are usually 18-25 degrees per side, but have a much thinner blade, which is why they seem to slice better. Kitchen knives will have spine thicknesses of 2mm ~ 5mm while razor blades are generally about 0.1mm ~ 0.5mm thick", writes Ken Schawartz.
This is why the cutting bevel needs to be as thin as possible not much more than1/32 of an inch otherwise the knife will smash through food rather than cut through it.
So if you have regular customers either say every other sharpening it is going to be important to re-dress the thinning bevel I do this at no extra charge for regulars but I would charge extra for a new casual customer.
The benefit of a descent thinning bevel as well it that there is less thickness to sharpen and that may also mean that you can start with 600 grit so that in many ways helps
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New customer from the farmers market. 11 months 2 weeks ago #13412

  • cbwx34
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This morning I "stole" the neighbors knife block... the typical: "How long have you had them?" Forever. "Ever sharpen them?" Sure, I use the sharpener that came with them (a grooved steel). So, needless to say, dull..... (duller than my practice knives I tried this on the other day for sure).

The knives were: 8" Chef's knife, 8" Util. knife, 5" paring (or utility) style knife, 3 1/2" paring knife, and 4" boning style knife. Not high dollar stuff (I forgot to look at the brand, but a low end set).

Only preset was the angle on the WE was already set. Started at 8:09 finished at 8:51. So, an average of 8.4 min. per knife. I went fairly quick, but didn't feel rushed. I also added one thing different... after finishing with the 600g stone, I reversed direction and did a dozen or so tip to heel, then the rest (ceramic and leather) tip to heel. (I like the grind marks pointing back, since most people slice heel to tip). Also a test slice thru copy paper at the end of every knife. Had to spend some extra time on the Chef's knife... the tip was way off from the rest of the blade.

So, not bad.... see what they think after a bit of use.
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