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TOPIC: Diamond stone break-in

Diamond stone break-in 3 weeks 6 days ago #18627

  • Jetech
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I am waiting to get my Pro Pack II kit and wondering about the break-in period for diamond plates. I have read here many times that it takes 5-10 knifes before they perform optimally. A question that comes to mind is, can the plates be rubbed together of the same grit to accelerate that time and scrub the high points of the diamonds? Is this acceptable or a bad thing to do? Will it help is the bottom line?
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Diamond stone break-in 3 weeks 6 days ago #18628

  • blacksheep25
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pretty sure i read somewhere that diamond on diamond is NOT recommended. for the same reason that you don't want to apply too much pressure with diamond based cutters; essentially let the diamonds (not the applied force) do the work. excessive force will knock the diamonds lose from the metal backing plate.

there is a learning curve to the WEPS just like any new system or tool; hence it's highly beneficial to practice on some cheap knives; side benefit is the stones get broken in, but so does the user. ;)
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Diamond stone break-in 3 weeks 6 days ago #18629

  • Mikedoh
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As blacksheep said, DO NOT rub the diamond stones together.
Last Edit: 3 weeks 6 days ago by Mikedoh.
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Diamond stone break-in 3 weeks 6 days ago #18630

  • Jetech
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I can understand the answer, but working in the engineering field and maintenance, I like to also understand the reason. Anyone have any additional info why?
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Diamond stone break-in 3 weeks 6 days ago #18631

  • Geocyclist
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You would rip the diamonds off, and they would still need breaking in or you would have almost no diamonds left, just steel plates. These stones (nor any stone) is 100.00000% perfectly flat. What happens when you break the stones in is the diamonds that are a little higher or bigger than the rest get worn down. First knife you notice very deep scratches. As they get broken in all the diamonds get to the same height and the scratches get smaller. Image a hair brush with a few bristles that are longer than the rest.

My advice, find a knife or two to practice on. Do it. Do another one, the redo the first one again and check your progress. Just get as many strokes as possible on the first knives. After 5 you will notice a difference, after 10 you will be more improvement, after 20 still a little more. I don't think there are an shortcuts. Just grind away on the first few practice knives. Get a lot of strokes in on your practice knives, you break the stones in and you also get practice on your technique.

Never, never, never, rub diamonds plates together. (Some other stones like water stones you do this with).

Welcome to the forum and enjoy.
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Diamond stone break-in 3 weeks 6 days ago #18633

  • tcmeyer
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To amplify on what Geo is saying, the diamonds are attached to the substrate as part of a nickel plating process. To ensure that the entire surface is covered with diamond grit, they pile it on heavily. During the break-in period, diamond grit that sits high and proud is knocked off, leaving a uniform pattern of grit which is tightly formed. When I look at my diamond blocks, or at the coarser versions of diamond film I have on hand with my microscope, what I see looks like a table full of billiard balls, all packed together tightly. These are the diamond grits, lined up in formation like little soldiers. The grit laying right on the substrate is held by the nickel plating on all sides except for the exposed side. This is a really solid connection and before you can dislodge one particular piece of grit, you have to break away its neighbor. This is the danger of rubbing one diamond block against another. Something's got to give, and both pieces are diamonds. After the high-sitting diamonds are knocked loose in the break-in process, any further diamond losses are from the main platen and are permanent and unretrievable. A plate with its diamond grit scraped away is just a chunk of metal and worth about $85 dollars less..

Diamonds are not forever here on our little internet planet. But they are for as long as you treat them well. Save your diamond plates for lapping natural stones or hand-sharpening.
Last Edit: 3 weeks 5 days ago by tcmeyer. Reason: typo
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