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TOPIC: Getting started

Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5704

  • StevenPinson
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An endoscope (or recording microscope) works wonders in this department, allowing a standard match to take place (i.e. a .5mm pencil lead) in comparison to the bevel. Just an FYI
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Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5711

  • cbwx34
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StevenPinson wrote:
An endoscope (or recording microscope) works wonders in this department, allowing a standard match to take place (i.e. a .5mm pencil lead) in comparison to the bevel. Just an FYI

This post makes little sense, anyway, a "recording microscope" is not really a good recommendation when starting out. A simple loupe/magnifier would be more beneficial. Burr detection and marking the edge with a Sharpie is "tried and true" across many methods of sharpening.

Just an FYI. B)

(I can't bring myself to call it an endoscope.) :sick: :ohmy:
EricCleland wrote:
Ok I will give the sharpie a try tonight when I get home from work and see. Then watch for the burr and try to progress from there. Thanks everyone for the help Im sure I am going to have more questions hope youall dont get tired of my questions.

I think you got the idea... keep us posted on how it goes!
Last Edit: 1 year 9 months ago by cbwx34.
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Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5712

  • StevenPinson
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cbwx34 wrote:
StevenPinson wrote:
An endoscope (or recording microscope) works wonders in this department, allowing a standard match to take place (i.e. a .5mm pencil lead) in comparison to the bevel. Just an FYI

This post makes little sense, anyway, a "recording microscope" is not really a good recommendation when starting out. A simple loupe/magnifier would be more beneficial. Burr detection and marking the edge with a Sharpie is "tried and true" across many methods of sharpening.

Just an FYI. B)

(I can't bring myself to call it an endoscope.) :sick: :ohmy:
EricCleland wrote:
Ok I will give the sharpie a try tonight when I get home from work and see. Then watch for the burr and try to progress from there. Thanks everyone for the help Im sure I am going to have more questions hope youall dont get tired of my questions.

I think you got the idea... keep us posted on how it goes!

I guess ignorance is bliss in your case. Another FYI just for you.
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Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5713

So the settings that are in the phamphlet like 18 deg for a kitchen knife and 22 deg. for a hunting knife where do those settings come from. If using the sharpie is the best way to set the angle then why have these settings? This is where I get confused because then you can change it but change it to what angle how do you know what is the angle to change it to to get the best edge on the knife.
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Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5714

  • cbwx34
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EricCleland wrote:
So the settings that are in the phamphlet like 18 deg for a kitchen knife and 22 deg. for a hunting knife where do those settings come from. If using the sharpie is the best way to set the angle then why have these settings? This is where I get confused because then you can change it but change it to what angle how do you know what is the angle to change it to to get the best edge on the knife.

Those settings are recommended... I'm not sure the best way to describe it, but I'll try... as a starting point, more for the person who just wants to "insert knife, follow instructions, remove sharp blade". :unsure: Think of it this way, what if someone who bought the sharpener and never visited a forum, got the WE with no guidelines on setting an angle? That would really be confusing. The suggested angles like 18 for kitchen etc. are based in part on how most knives of that type are sharpened, the type of use they'll get, and how they'll perform. In other words, a kitchen knife is thinner, can take a thinner edge because (in theory) it will see lighter chores, vs. a hunting knife that will see harder work, so it should have a more robust edge.

If you get into sharpening, and more importantly, learn proper use of a knife, you may find that you could put a smaller angle on a hunting knife, because you're going to use it properly, and not "beat up" the edge.

The reason I suggest the Sharpie method is, I feel it's a better starting point then setting an angle and spending what may be a lot of time trying to achieve this. Matching the existing angle as a start, will result in a very sharp edge, like I said probably sharper than new, while giving you an idea of how sharpening in general, and the WE specifically works.

To determine what angle to change to... occurs over time or with experience. Almost all knives can go thinner. So if you sharpen a knife, and the edge holds up well, next time drop down a couple of degrees and see how it does. Conversely, if you sharpen and an edge readily fails based on how you use it, increasing the angle will make a stronger edge.
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Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5715

ok that makes sense then as I get used to doing this then I can figure out or ask and get advanced guidelines on how to set the blade angle secondary to the use of the knife. AWESOME I am so glad that this forum is here because I was going to sell my sharpener because of the money I had in it and I could not figure it out. It was not as easy as it was when Clay used it on the outdoor channel and then shaved :)
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Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5723

  • cbwx34
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The beauty of using an actual sharpener, vs. some type of pull thru - hope for the best device, or one that doesn't let you adjust anything, is that, although there is a bit of a learning process, once you "get it", you'll be able to adjust the sharpening to fit your needs, as well as achieve a higher level of sharpness.

You'll also better understand what actually makes a knife sharp, so if you're caught somewhere without the WE, you could take a stone or other abrasive and know how to at least get a knife to cut decent.

There is a reward at the end! :woohoo:
Last Edit: 1 year 9 months ago by cbwx34.
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Re: Getting started 1 year 9 months ago #5738

  • Allgonquin
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More on the Sharpie bit vs. just using a recommended angle. When I try to match angles using a sharpie, I make a very gentle pass with the 800 stone, basically just trying to wipe off as much Sharpie ink as possible. If your setting is off (and it usually is if it is a new knife to you) you are not really taking any significant metal off by doing this. So you make the pass, and adjust the arm in or out a degree or two until you get the most "wipe". Then you know you are about as well matched as you are going to get, and typically you will start your progression with the finer grits instead of the coarser grits.

If I'm doing a knife that isn't in too bad a shape, I don't necessarily want to reprofile it, just match the existing angles. On the other hand the angles suggested in the manual, 18, for example, are just that - suggestions or recommendations. If you have an old kitchen knife with a munged up edge, you're going to want to reprofile it anyway and 18 degrees is a good suggested angle to use. No Sharpie marking needed, just set up for 18 degrees, put on the 100 grit stones and have at it until you get the burr. Now you are on your way to a reprofiled edge as you go through the progression.

Once you get experience you can decide what angles you like, based on how you use your knives. For me, I tend to higher angles on kitchen knives than pocket knives, because my kitchen knives get "abused" by the family and the higher angles tend to last a bit longer. But that's just me.

Rgds,
Allgonquin

Objects in closer are mirror than they appear
Last Edit: 1 year 9 months ago by Allgonquin.
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