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TOPIC: Blade inspection

Blade inspection 4 months 5 days ago #15044

  • GibCurry
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OK, this is a really beginner question.

I've been searching through both Google & BING to find some definitive reference on how to inspect a (knife) blade before sharpening.

I've searched and searched through this forum.

I really haven't found anything. Am I missing it? Please, if you know of a reference, please let me know.

If you all don't know either, then maybe we need to start the list! I know, I've ruined two knives (cheap -- no big deal) because I didn't fully understand what I should look for and didn't adequately inspect them to see what the blade actually was!!

How do you determine the grind of a blade? Trust the info of the owner? Look it up online? Just set a (new) angle and sharpen away?

How do you tell if it's got a micro-bevel? How do you tell if it's convex? How do you determine if a blade needs re-profiled?

Blade Inspection Prior to Sharpening: What to look for and how to look for it!

Length x Width x Height
Grind
Steel
Primary Bevel
Secondary Bevel
Convex
Scratch & Ding repair
Polishing

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I know. I know. It sounds like I need a class. I've made contact with a local master sharpener and will be taking his four hour, one-on-one, water stone sharpening intensive either in the next few days or after the first of the year.

Since I really started diving into the art & science of sharpening, my head is swirling with a tsunami of information about blade steels, goniometers and sub-micron molecule polishing.

I'm looking to begin sorting some of this out and seeing it organized.

I see Tuffy and all you others out there turning out sharp knives of all kinds and I'm in awe. I see you sharpening all these beautiful chef's blades and custom knives and I'm envious.

I'm so nervous when I take someone else's knife. Even with one of the best sharpeners around, I've still found ways to ruin a blade!!

In the meantime, while I'm waiting for my class, am I missing something here in this forum or does anyone have any valuable links with this kind of information?

Thanks, in advance, guys, for any help you can offer.

I'll stop moaning and whining now and go sharpen a knife.
~~~~

For Now,

Gib

Ï•

"Things work out best for those who make the best out of the way things work out."

"My goal is to be a good, practical knife sharpener. My dream is to polish molecules."
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Blade inspection 4 months 5 days ago #15046

  • EamonMcGowan
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Hi Gib,
Taking a class from a master sound very exciting! Learning water stones from a pro sounds great to me! I have been talking to Murray Carter about taking his class in 2014. Kind of a learning/technical vacation?
It is very, very expensive though. If i can keep from buying new firearms stuff I should be good to go?
I'm sorry to hear you are having such a bad time! I'm curious? What is happening to the blade that it is ruined? Maybe we can work backwards and help you?
The definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over again and expect a different result?
An old Irish toast, May the wind always be at your back, may you always have work and may you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows your dead. Cheers!
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Blade inspection 4 months 5 days ago #15047

  • LeoBarr
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I can't help but think that you are overcomplicating the issue here is a site that may help answer a few questions forums.egullet.org/topic/26036-knife-mai...ance-and-sharpening/
I think that all learning involves mistakes that is invaluable in learning .
As for using water stones bench stones it is very easy provided you practice enough there are plenty of good instructional videos on you tube by both Korin & Jon Japanese Knife Imports & Chefs knives to go . I think Murray Carter has a few you tube vids on how to look at a blade for imperfections - his three finger rule every thing you need is on the net ; as far as freehand sharpening is concerned you find your own style over time but Korin or Japanese Knife Imports are probable the best to learn from .
I have spent many hours researching both knives , sharpening tools & techniques and there is still more out there .
Here is another worthwhile site and there is an app for IOS or Android for this site as well zknives.com/knives/articles/knifesteelfaq.shtml
Whilst courses are good fun I do not believe they are necessary as long as you are prepared to be critical of your own technique always trying to perfect it .
Good luck to you Gib I hope it helps I would suggest mastering the WE first with both V bevels and convex bevels plus of courses thinning bevels once these are mastered then if you wish to start to learn freehand sharpening then this is the time .
Last Edit: 4 months 5 days ago by LeoBarr. Reason: spelling
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Blade inspection 4 months 4 days ago #15049

  • GibCurry
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EamonMcGowan wrote:
Hi Gib,
Taking a class from a master sound very exciting! Learning water stones from a pro sounds great to me! I have been talking to Murray Carter about taking his class in 2014. Kind of a learning/technical vacation?
It is very, very expensive though. If i can keep from buying new firearms stuff I should be good to go?
I'm sorry to hear you are having such a bad time! I'm curious? What is happening to the blade that it is ruined? Maybe we can work backwards and help you?

au contraire!! :ohmy:

I don't feel I'm having a bad time; I'm wanting an accelerated, more in-depth and professional good time! :)

I haven't been paid, yet. But am working myself towards that. I've got a circle of friends and relatives that are bringing knives to me. My brother just dropped off four knives for me to sharpen. He's on his way to Hawaii from Fairbanks and wants them back soon so they can dress some game when they get home.

Like I said the knives I ruined were valueless for cutting but invaluable for learning. The best example was a Gerber multi-tool, rounded semi-tanto, partially serrated and asymmetrical.

Putting an equal grind on either side was, well, it didn't work, kind of decimated the blade and taught me a lot! For which I am eternally grateful.

A large part of the class I'm signed up for addresses knife inspection. I'll ask the instructor how much he is comfortable letting me share of that kind of information.

Thanks for the reply. Very much appreciated.
~~~~

For Now,

Gib

Ï•

"Things work out best for those who make the best out of the way things work out."

"My goal is to be a good, practical knife sharpener. My dream is to polish molecules."
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Blade inspection 4 months 4 days ago #15050

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LeoBarr wrote:
I can't help but think that you are overcomplicating the issue .

I knew I was moaning and whining!! :sick:

I haven't checked out the links you sent but promise I will devour them soon.

You also offered this advice, "Whilst courses are good fun I do not believe they are necessary as long as you are prepared to be critical of your own technique always trying to perfect it."

I feel good about knowing that there is more I don't know than I do know!! Part of my general life-long learning philosophy. I find some joy in sometimes excruciatingly wonderful process of finding my own gaps and filling them.
~~~~

For Now,

Gib

Ï•

"Things work out best for those who make the best out of the way things work out."

"My goal is to be a good, practical knife sharpener. My dream is to polish molecules."
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