Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
Sharpener and Accessory Maintenance

TOPIC: Chosera stone maintenance

Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11385

  • MattCole
  • MattCole's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 16
  • Karma: 0
I now have all of the Chosera stones (except the 400/600) and they are great. So now I need to maintain them and keep them flat. It's kind of a vicious cycle.
Most things I read say Atoma 140, but how fine of a Chosera can I lap with this? Would a 400 Atoma be too fine to lap an 800 Chosera? I'd like to buy no more that 2 Atoma plates to maintain the 800 through 10k Chosera stones, so which 2 should I get? Could I get away with just one?

I was just about to pull the trigger on an Atoma 140 but I thought I would throw the question out here first.

Also, I see that most Chosera stones come with a Nagura stone for prep and maintenance. Do any of you use this on your WE Chosera stones? I read some thread that suggested using a 140 Atoma and dress with the Nagura on all the Chosera stones through the 10k. Would that work? While I don't want to end up buying an Atoma 140, 400, 600, and 1200, I don't want to skimp on the maintenance of these stones either.

Any input is appreciated
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11386

  • PhilipPasteur
  • PhilipPasteur's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Phil
  • Posts: 944
  • Thank you received: 233
  • Karma: 66
Take a look at this:
www.wickededgeusa.com/index.php?option=c...=2524&Itemid=63#2556

BTW, I use a DMT XXC or XC for everything. Mostly these days the XXC... works faster. DMT doesn't recommend lapping on anything but their $200 lapping plate... I have smoothed out the XC considerably, but I got the DMT plates for lapping stones, not sharpening. I hit the 5K and 10K with the Extra Fine DMT for a bit of smoothing.

Not sure why you would need Atoma plates. Quite expensive for this use.
Phil

MAX 2001-2013
Hoping there is that bridge!
I miss you Buddy!
Last Edit: 1 year 1 month ago by PhilipPasteur.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11392

  • KenBuzbee
  • KenBuzbee's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 397
  • Thank you received: 110
  • Karma: 22
I agree with Phil, BUT... Honestly, I haven't needed to lap my Choseras yet. I just rub them together, wet, for a bit before use and that seems to handle it.

I fully expect I'll need to lap them at some point, but it hasn't happened yet.

Ken

(edit - one caveat... I do not use my Choseras and Super Stones for "sharpening" per se. I let the diamonds do the heavy lifting. This is probably a factor in why, to date, my water stones have not needed flattening.)
玉鋼
Last Edit: 1 year 1 month ago by KenBuzbee.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11393

  • cbwx34
  • cbwx34's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Moderator
  • Posts: 1258
  • Thank you received: 410
  • Karma: 92
If they're not too out of shape... could you not just use the WE coarse (100) diamond to maintain them? I've used a DMT XXC stone on lots of full size stone for years and it's still going strong. Just lap under running water.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11400

  • MattCole
  • MattCole's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 16
  • Karma: 0
They are like $50 cheaper than the DMT Diaflat plates. That's really the only reason I was leaning that way.

Thanks for the link, A lot of good information, still not done reading all of it yet.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11401

  • jendeindustries
  • jendeindustries's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 326
  • Thank you received: 113
  • Karma: 34
Here's my video of lapping Choseras and Shaptons using the WEPS diamonds and the full size Atomas.



About 5 minutes in, it discusses some of the texturing issues with using a very coarse lapping plate on a fine stone. You don't NEED to use many plates, but I highly recommend using the 400, 600, 800 or 1K WEPS diamonds or 400, 600 or 1200 Atoma diamonds on the 5K stones and higher.

You can also use DMT plates. The process outlined in the video is the same. However, the DMT XX Coarse, Extra Coarse, and Coarse are better for lapping. The fine, extra fine and FF fine have serious sticktion issues, making them pretty much useless for lapping.

For quick and simple lapping, you can get away with rubbing the 2 same grit stones together, but it is always better to lap them on a flat surface once in a while to true things up. With the precision the WEPS offers, dished stones can cause headaches.
Tom Blodgett
Jende Industries, LLC

My Blog: jendeindustries.wordpress.com
Last Edit: 1 year 1 month ago by jendeindustries.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: cbwx34

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11402

  • MattCole
  • MattCole's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 16
  • Karma: 0
Thanks, I just ordered an Atoma 140 and 600. Hopefully I will be content with those for lapping all of my Choseras.

So no one uses the Nagura with their Chosera stones?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11403

  • PhilipPasteur
  • PhilipPasteur's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Phil
  • Posts: 944
  • Thank you received: 233
  • Karma: 66
MattCole wrote:
They are like $50 cheaper than the DMT Diaflat plates. That's really the only reason I was leaning that way.

Thanks for the link, A lot of good information, still not done reading all of it yet.

A quick check shows the 8" DMT XXC is about $65. Atoma 400 about $120.

The Dia-flat lapping plate that you talk about is more expensive ($190 +/-). Supposedly flat to high tolerances ("Each Dia-Flat is hand-certified to flatness of ±0.0005" across its surface") and with a "hard coat" method of applying the diamonds (Using the new revolutionary DMT® Diamond Hardcoat Technology™, this lapping plate outlasts any other diamond coating in the market. ). It is also 10" X4". It is not the plate (s) that I talked about and that Curtis mentioned. It is probably not directly comparable to any of the Atoma plates.

Tom,
I use the extra fine DMT plate for texturing. Yes stiction can be a small problem. With plenty of water and the low amount of time required for a little texturing, it is serviceable, if not ideal.

BTW the D8E is around $50. The Atoma 1200 about $120 give or take. I only mention this to clarify for Matt . It appears that he did not understand the specifics of the plates I was talking about.

BTW (2), if I was going to use diamond bench hones extensively to sharpen knives , I would look closely at the Atoma plates. For use only in lapping stones, it is hard for me to justify the additional cost.
Phil

MAX 2001-2013
Hoping there is that bridge!
I miss you Buddy!
Last Edit: 1 year 1 month ago by PhilipPasteur.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11404

  • Geocyclist
  • Geocyclist's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 417
  • Thank you received: 135
  • Karma: 31
I don't claim to be an expert here, but I just lap them. I do this to make the slurry, but figure a side benefit is it helps keep them flat. Don't know if something more aggressive or flatter is required?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Chosera stone maintenance 1 year 1 month ago #11405

  • PhilipPasteur
  • PhilipPasteur's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Phil
  • Posts: 944
  • Thank you received: 233
  • Karma: 66
Geocyclist wrote:
I don't claim to be an expert here, but I just lap them. I do this to make the slurry, but figure a side benefit is it helps keep them flat. Don't know if something more aggressive or flatter is required?

As we always say...it depends. If you read Kens thread and even listen to Tom's video, you can't come away thinking that more than simply rubbing the stones together for a bit before using them is required. Put a good straight edge on your stones. If they are not perfectly flat, in length, width and diagonally, a case can be made for needing to lap them with something more than each other.

There are those in the sharpening world that will not use a stone without lapping it "perfectly" flat every single time.
Phil

MAX 2001-2013
Hoping there is that bridge!
I miss you Buddy!
Last Edit: 1 year 1 month ago by PhilipPasteur.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.157 seconds