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TOPIC: An Alternate Way to Find Your Knife Bevel Angle

An Alternate Way to Find Your Knife Bevel Angle 1 year 8 months ago #9206

  • FredHermann
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So I was watching this:

And it made me think...
All those times I really wanted to know a bevel angle, it can be done with shadows and a protractor and right angle gauge.
This guy has a great, if somewhat complex way to do it.
Which made me think...
Heck with that...I put a bubble level on a knife, and my angle gauge on the blade, leveled it, and the gauge shows the factory bevel.

I may be on to something....
“On one otherwise normal Tuesday evening I had the chance to live the American dream. I was able to throw my incompetent jack*ss of a boss from a fourteenth-story window.”

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Re: An Alternate Way to Find Your Knife Bevel Angle 1 year 8 months ago #9216

  • PhilipPasteur
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FredHermann wrote:
Heck with that...I put a bubble level on a knife, (where) and my angle gauge on the blade, (how, what orientation) leveled it, (leveled what??) and the gauge shows the factory bevel.
I may be on to something....

I don't at all follow what you are saying here.. admittedly I am a bit slow... but maybe you can give me a better explanation of what exactly that you did...

Oh, and the method in the video is likely not workable. Can you imagine holdine that guage consistently through a complete sharpening? How does one control the angle at the tip. Much better I think just to learn to keep a sigle fairly consistent angle and stay with it... or better...get a WEPS !!:evil: .

Phil
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Last Edit: 1 year 8 months ago by PhilipPasteur.
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Re: An Alternate Way to Find Your Knife Bevel Angle 1 year 8 months ago #9221

  • mark76
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That's an ingenious guided angle system. And also a one that seems rather impractical, as Phil noted. But maybe it is somewhat of an aid for people doing free-hand sharpening who have a problem keeping their angles.
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Re: An Alternate Way to Find Your Knife Bevel Angle 1 year 8 months ago #9251

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I have to agree, that this is not a perfect solution he's found.
It's my belief he's never seen something like the Wicked Edge, or even a Landsky system, and came up with his own similar solution with the tools he had.

What would be interesting is how he figured this out. The story would be good.

Now as to what I meant...if I can get a picture or two I will, so let me know if this makes sense.

If you zero the cube on the WEPS base, lay the knife blade flat on the base, you can get the grind angle by sticking the angle cube on it. Yes, it’s not perfect, but it can get you really close. So far I'm within .5 degree compared to putting it in the vice and measuring the way we all do.

There has to be a flaw in my logic though, it's too easy.
“On one otherwise normal Tuesday evening I had the chance to live the American dream. I was able to throw my incompetent jack*ss of a boss from a fourteenth-story window.”

Owen Pitt – Monster Hunter International
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Re: An Alternate Way to Find Your Knife Bevel Angle 1 year 8 months ago #9254

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Obviously I cannot look in his mind, but I don't think this guy was attempting to make something like a WEPS or a Lansky. I think he was just trying to develop a simple aid for free-hand sharpeners. I find it quite ingenious.

Fred, I guess some pictures would help ;) .
Last Edit: 1 year 8 months ago by mark76.
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Re: An Alternate Way to Find Your Knife Bevel Angle 1 year 8 months ago #9259

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FredHermann wrote:
If you zero the cube on the WEPS base, lay the knife blade flat on the base, you can get the grind angle by sticking the angle cube on it. Yes, it’s not perfect, but it can get you really close. So far I'm within .5 degree compared to putting it in the vice and measuring the way we all do.There has to be a flaw in my logic though, it's too easy.

Maybe the problem is the terms in use. Laying the knife on a glat surface and using the cube as you describe would give you the primary grind angle... maybe. It would work OK with a full flat frind, not too well with a conves grind or hollow frind. The thing I am having problems with understanding here is, in the context of the WEPS, we usually are not concerned with this angle. We want to measure the secondary grind, the bevel at the edge. As the bevel is typically not very wide, I would think that it sould be difficult to hold the knife with this bevel flat on a surface. If you could, then you could measure the angle as you describe doing it. BTW When I say "flat", I am thinking of the situation where the spine and the shoulder of the secondary bevel are in contact with the flat surface. Now,this works in full flat grinds, or when using the beginning of the primary grind in a hollow grind blade. Not sure you can even do what you are talking about with a convex grind.

Most knives, especially those from factories, combine two or three planes on each side of the blade. There is usually a flat portion near the spine of the blade. The primary grind, that reduces the thickness of the blade to form the edge may be concave, flat, or convex. There is usually a secondary bevel which is less acute and forms the edge itself.
www.ragweedforge.com/grind.html

This one is good too!
backyardbushman.com/?page_id=13

So what do you think you are measuring when the knife is "flat" on a surface? Will it tell you the angle to set when sharpening?


Phil
Phil

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Hoping there is that bridge!
I miss you Buddy!
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