Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Asian v\s European v\s Tri bevel convex sharpening

Asian v\s European v\s Tri bevel convex sharpening 1 year 11 months ago #4919

  • JerrieBarber
  • JerrieBarber's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Junior Boarder
  • Posts: 23
  • Thank you received: 7
  • Karma: 6
I thought I was a fanatic about sharpening until I started reading last night. Wow, a lot of you guys absolutely Rock!!! I am no where near as geeked out about sharpening as I thought. That being said what is the school of thought on these sharpening techniques? I like to whittle hair as much as the next guy, but I also want to have a blade the remains sharp and that does not have to be fooled with every day. The more I read the more confused I have become. So for EDC, in the field, day in and day out use what are the advantages and disadvantages of a straight (Asian) sharpening, a bi-hone or double honed European edge, or a triple honed convex edge?
Feel free to correct and instruct. Specifically I am carrying an Esee Izula (I have a job that allows such carry), and or a Hinderer XM-18 3.5. Obviously I want them both to be as cutting, whittling, hair splitting sharp as they can be and effective for every day use.
Proverbs 27:17, As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: leomitch

Re: Asian v\s European v\s Tri bevel convex sharpening 1 year 11 months ago #4993

  • leomitch
  • leomitch's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 719
  • Thank you received: 207
  • Karma: 92
Hi Jerrie
I am not sure I understand the terms Asian Edge etc. but I think I know what you are asking, so I will give you my 2 cents worth. The Izula is an excellent little knife and the 1095 tool steel takes and retains a razor edge fairly easily. The guys at ESEE use a 20 degree per side edge and that is good. I use a 22 degree per side edge for a long lasting and very strong edge. But better still is a convex edge starting at 18 degrees then moving to 20 degrees and then finishing with 22 degrees per side. Somewhere on the WE site there are instructions for doing this kind of edge and there have been many posts on how to do it, but in essence it is basically a fully developed 18 degree per side edge and then a lightly developed 20 and the 22 degree per side edge and then the strops are used to blend the 20 and 22 degree shoulders into the 18 degree geometry giving you the convex edge you want. The figure 18, 20 and 22 are just examples...you could start with 16 degrees and work out another edge like 16-18-20. It is fun to play with an I guarantee you that the edge you will get is super sharp, sturdy and long lasting. It will touch up easily with stropping alone for a long time. The edge will just get better and better. If you can't find the full instructions on the site or among the posts, PM me and I will walk you through it. Better to look it up yourself and try it in various ways...you will learn better that way and you get to know your steel and the WEPS intimately!

Cheers
Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
Last Edit: 1 year 11 months ago by leomitch.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Asian v\s European v\s Tri bevel convex sharpening 1 year 11 months ago #4995

  • JerrieBarber
  • JerrieBarber's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Junior Boarder
  • Posts: 23
  • Thank you received: 7
  • Karma: 6
Thanks Leo
Some of the magazines call a straight grind sharpening an Asian sharpening. Can't remember which one I was looking at but probably "Tactical Knife". None the less i am putting a convex sharpening in my Esee right now and will try that for a while. Am excited to see how it all comes out.
Proverbs 27:17, As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Asian v\s European v\s Tri bevel convex sharpening 1 year 11 months ago #4998

  • iamtwon
  • iamtwon's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 19
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 6
This may be helpful.

!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Asian v\s European v\s Tri bevel convex sharpening 1 year 11 months ago #5001

  • cbwx34
  • cbwx34's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Moderator
  • Posts: 1260
  • Thank you received: 413
  • Karma: 92
Excellent answer, Leo. I thought of this question when it was posted, and couldn't come up with an answer that wasn't a book. :)

I might add to check the Database wickededgeusa.com/index.php?option=com_j...ew=catalog&Itemid=94 and see if your knife or a similar knife is listed. I think there's a Hinderer in there. Might give you some guidance. (And add yours when your done.)
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Asian v\s European v\s Tri bevel convex sharpening 1 year 11 months ago #5011

  • JerrieBarber
  • JerrieBarber's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Junior Boarder
  • Posts: 23
  • Thank you received: 7
  • Karma: 6
I received my Hinderer the same day I received my Wicked Edge. I sharpened it as soon as it came out of the box, however it was about the fifth knife I sharpened that day. The Hinderer was sharpened at a 15 degree flat ground to polish up to the .5 micron strops. I can and have shaved my neck with that blade. It is nasty sharp. So I guess what is on my mind is am I any better off tho convex that blade? Am I going to loose any of that sharpness? I know what that blade can do now. I can also report that I did re-sharpen my Izula 16-18-20, but went in that progression, in the video above that was suggested, and thanks for posting, Clay went from greatest angle to least angle and filled in between. Not sure if one method is better than another. Thanks guys for sharing you time and knowledge and anything you see hear that you can speak to would be wonderful. I am greatful.
Proverbs 27:17, As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.145 seconds