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TOPIC: Stock stone/strop progression (Lots of Pics!!)

Re: Stock stone/strop progression 2 years 5 months ago #2096

  • wickededge
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The next step was the 1 micron boron carbide on top grain cow leather:

One-Micron-Boron-Carbide-Ascending_2012-03-15-2.jpg

1 Micron Boron Carbide Top Grain Cow Leather

Here the burnishing and polishing seem pretty clear. All the fine little ridges are flattened out, reducing the light scattering and allowing us to see the deep scratches. I put on a polarizing filter because so much light was now reflecting back into the lens. In retrospect, I wish I'd done a step at this point with clean, top grain cow leather. Maybe even before the split grain horse butt leather. I'm taking notes for a future progression as these questions come up.

I've got some emails and calls to answer, but I'll come back and continue once I can break free.
--Clay Allison
Last Edit: 2 years 5 months ago by wickededge.
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Re: Stock stone/strop progression 2 years 5 months ago #2097

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LukasPop wrote:
Great work Clay! It looks that leather strops do much better polishing than stones, although particle size is about the same. But I am interested, if this polishing is transfered to cutting performance also. Do you plan to perform any cutting tests after different stone/strop progressions?

I think that's a great next step. Most likely, I'd try to divide the cutting tests into at least two categories; push-cut and slice.
--Clay Allison
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Re: Stock stone/strop progression 2 years 5 months ago #2098

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mark76 wrote:
However, sometimes I find it hard to identify the effects of the stropping compounds. How, for example, can we see in the Global knife pictures the differences between the effects of the 1 micron compound and the .25 micron compound (other than more burnishing, due to the fact that you did more stropping movements)?

Also, when on the Global knife, you go up again in micron sizes (after the .125 micron), the edge looks more refined after the 3.5 and 5 micron pastes than after the .125 micron compound. Does this mean the abrasive effect of the 3.5 and 5 micron pastes is minimal? Or something else?

This is where the progression is flawed because I used the horse butt leather for the .25/.125 and cow leather for the 5/3.5 strops. I wish now I'd used the cow leather for both! I think the biggest difference we're seeing is in the leather itself. Clearly I'm going to have to repeat some of this using the same leather (ideally from the same lot) to do the entire progression. One thing that seems easy enough to see is the increasingly larger scratches as I descended back down the ladder from 3.5> 5> 10> 14.
--Clay Allison
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Re: Stock stone/strop progression 2 years 5 months ago #2100

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razoredgeknives wrote:
wow! that is one beautiful edge! I just don't understand how you got such a nice edge with minimal effort!!!! (i.e. 20 strokes per side all the way up to 1600!) It must have to do with the steel... how hard were you pushing on the passes? Also, how many passes did you do with each grit strop? Thanks for this Clay!!!

Here are some pictures of my 100 grit stones compared with some new 100 grit stones:

100GritDiamondStones-Used-Non-Polarized.jpg.jpg

Used 100 Grit - Not polarized

100GritDiamondStones-Used.jpg

Used 100 Grit - Polarized

100GritDiamondStones-Used-Non-Polarized.jpg.jpg

New 100 Grit - Not polarized

100GritDiamondStones-New.jpg

New 100 Grit - Polarized

On the new stones, what you're seeing are all the diamonds that have yet to be knocked of. Until those are gone, you won't even be able to see the layer below. All the extra diamonds dig much deeper scratches and the edge you get is significantly more toothy until the stones are broken in. The same is true with all the diamond stones. I think that's why I was able to move from grit to grit so quickly and end up with such a nice result. Another progression to do: New 100 grit> Old 100 grit> New 200 grit> Old 200 grit> New 400 grit> Old 400 grit etc...!
--Clay Allison
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Re: Stock stone/strop progression 2 years 5 months ago #2104

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Very clear, Clay. Thanks!

I guess I'll do some experiments myself using the WEPS strops, that feel very smooth. They are clearly top grain leather. Are they cow leather?
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Re: Stock stone/strop progression 2 years 5 months ago #2105

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mark76 wrote:
Very clear, Clay. Thanks!

I guess I'll do some experiments myself using the WEPS strops, that feel very smooth. They are clearly top grain leather. Are they cow leather?

They are cow leather. I'd love to see your results once you get some experiments done.
--Clay Allison
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