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TOPIC: Diamond &Ceramic Plates - Microscope progression

Re: Diamond &Ceramic Plates - Microscope progression 2 years 5 months ago #1714

  • mark76
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Great pictures, Tom! I can see you're good at fiddling B) and can be patient.

Also very instructive. It's not just the pictures, but also you telling us what to pay attention to. Looking forward to the photographs of your results with the Chosera's and the Shaptons.

Lukas, from the article:
I keep the angles the same, and begin using scrubbing strokes, which are basically straight up and down strokes. Scrubbing cleans up the scratches from the circles, and establishes a very flat bevel angle.
:D
Last Edit: 2 years 5 months ago by mark76.
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Re: Diamond &Ceramic Plates - Microscope progression 2 years 5 months ago #1715

  • LukasPop
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mark76 wrote:
Lukas, from the article:
I keep the angles the same, and begin using scrubbing strokes, which are basically straight up and down strokes. Scrubbing cleans up the scratches from the circles, and establishes a very flat bevel angle.
:D
Yes, Mark, but there wasn't similar explanation of "sweeping". Then Leo wrote that sweeping is typical motion used by Clay on his videos. So I think it's clear now. :)
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Re: Diamond &Ceramic Plates - Microscope progression 2 years 5 months ago #1716

  • jendeindustries
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Thanks everyone!


I edited the post to explain the sweeping strokes a little more.

These progressions do take time, especially since everyone will see my pictures, so they must be perfect! But they are good quantitative data that will make for some very good discussions and learning. After all, this is all about the journey. B)

BTW - Mark - I was able to tighten the screw on the clip that holds the veho scope to the base. It took out about 90% of the wobble.... I wish I had thought about that sooner! :woohoo:
Tom Blodgett
Jende Industries, LLC

My Blog: jendeindustries.wordpress.com
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Re: Diamond &Ceramic Plates - Microscope progression 2 years 5 months ago #1717

  • mark76
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jendeindustries wrote:
These progressions do take time
Yes, I learned that the hard way. Your explanation of scratches from low-level grits suddenly becoming apparent again at much higher level grits was very informative in that respect. On the other hand, I also learned not to do too much polishing on every grit size. The first knife I did on the WE got beautifully sharp, but it took me five hours! So if you can give any indications about how long you spent grinding/polishing at a particular grit level (or the number of push strokes, or ...) that would be very helpful.
BTW - Mark - I was able to tighten the screw on the clip that holds the veho scope to the base. It took out about 90% of the wobble.... I wish I had thought about that sooner! :woohoo:

Do you mean you don't take your photographs anymore by setting the microscope directly on top of the blade surface? But instead use the base which you set at, e.g. 1 " from that blade ? If that is possible, it would be a real improvement what we can do with the Veho.
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Re: Diamond &Ceramic Plates - Microscope progression 2 years 5 months ago #1718

  • jendeindustries
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The WEPS diamond and ceramic progression took about 2 hours with "perfect" documentation. I've spent 3-4 hours documenting a progression, especially for the cleaver shave. The Shapton Progression will probably take a while simply because there are 10 stones :)

My first knife on the WEPS took about 3 hours. The learning curve, setting the angles with the cube (the most time consuming in the beginning), and just finding my groove took about 10 knives. I still go "slow", often taking about 1 hour on a knife because I like the idea of perfection when I use a guided sharpening device.

In general, the first grit takes the longest amount of time, and can take anywhere from 2 minutes to 2 hours, depending on the knife. After circles, I do scrubbing on one side until a burr forms, then scrub the other side. Then I'll do quite a bit of sweeping strokes to really establish that bevel.

On the 200 grits and above, things move faster. scrubbing should only take a few minutes, depending on the knife, and I start sweeping with a little pressure, and gradually ease off - probably about 200 strokes per side.

400 the same quick scrubbing, and probably about 200 or so sweeping. 600 a quick scrub, and I do a lot more sweeping - you really can't do too much at that level. Again, I start off with some pressure, and ease off towards the end and do many very light strokes to minimize burr formation.

The catch is the faster you go, usually the heavier handed you are, so foe that extra level of perfection, you really do need to slow it down at the end.

On the Choseras and Shaptons, I take my time on the first grit after the WEPS 600 to remove those deeper scratches which are hidden. Then I follow pretty much the same method per stone of scrub/sweep, but I like to maximize the potential of each grit, so I like to do a lot of strokes. Shaptons and Choseras are different, and I usually need to do more on the Choseras than on the Shaptons due to the polish I can get from the Choseras.

As for the veho, I kept the knife in the clamp for all pictures and put the lens right against the blade. When I document razors and other knives outside of the WEPS, the scope always wobbled a great deal. This is what usually adds the hours to the project.
Tom Blodgett
Jende Industries, LLC

My Blog: jendeindustries.wordpress.com
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Re: Diamond &Ceramic Plates - Microscope progression 2 years 5 months ago #1719

  • mark76
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Thanks Tom, this is EXTREMELY helpful! Glad Leo made this topic sticky, since I suspect many other beginning WEPS users will have similar questions and your information will drastically shorten their learning curves.
jendeindustries wrote:
As for the veho, I kept the knife in the clamp for all pictures and put the lens right against the blade.

i don't quite understand this point. Before you wrote that you were able to take better pictures by attaching the microscope much better to its base. But I interpret the words above as that you still put the lens right against the blade. But then you don't use the base anymore, do you? So what is the added value then of clamping it to the base? What am I missing?
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