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TOPIC: Renaissance in Writing!

Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7066

  • leomitch
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Lately I have been wooed away from my keyboard and word processor by my renewed love of pen and ink. It seems I am not alone, because millions of people world-wide are returning to the fountain pen and are turning away from ball-points and even roller balls...the opposite of what happened in the 1950's when the fountain pen almost disappeared due to the cheap ball-point pens by BIC and others.
I am writing my memoirs as well as trying to regain some of my skills in handwriting that I used as a kid in school and as a teacher before I became an administrator and then retired.
I find when I am using a fountain pen that I feel good and my brain works differently from when I use the computer. My thinking becomes more precise and incisive plus I take more time...something I have plenty of lately.
I took out my old Osmiroid pen that hasn't seen the light of day since I was writing poetry back in 1972 and of course I needed ink. Well I searched online and found a whole constellation of inks in an infinite rainbow of colours and hues. I also found the newest fountain pens. I was bitten and here is the result of that bite. I won't tell you the prices of these beauties for fear you will collapse with laughter...you know, like people do with you when you tell them how much you spend on knives and accessories. LOL!

I won't bore you with details, just some pictures of my more prized pens out of the 17 I collected since August.
The first one I won in an auction on e bay. The pen is from Aurora of Italy, an Optima Red Resin pen with 14K gold nib and furnishings.

The second one is also an Aurora pen, An Optima Auroloide Marbled Blue and it too has a 14K nib with gold furnishings.


The third is also, you guessed it, an Aurora pen named the Afrika Limited Edition pen with 18K gold nib and furnishings. Aurora has been making finely crafted pens since 1919.


Lest you think I have partially taken leave of my senses, you are wrong...I have completely taken that leave since I also have numerous journals, notebooks and practice papers and 12 different bottles of ink. I write every day many times and I am teaching my grandson Owen how to use a pen and how to write well. Something they don't really teach anymore. He is at my mercy because we are home-schooling him and after 40 years of teaching, you may be sure he is getting the full treatment. BTW he loves using a fountain pen and has his very own.
Stay tuned over the next while for more from Leo the ancient. I will be selling some of my knives soon, so keep your eyes peeled for them, like



and like this



Best to all
Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
Last Edit: 1 year 9 months ago by leomitch.
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Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7067

  • KenBuzbee
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Nice pens you got there, Leo. I have friends who are easily as into it so I understand your pricing comments.

Fortunately (for me), I went through a FP phase in college and have no desire to return to it ;) But enjoy your new hobby, brother.

Ken
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Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7068

  • JamesBell
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Leo Thanks for sharing, what a wonderful collection, there beautiful.
I understand that each pen takes on a personality and touch of the writer.
Very nice !!
- James
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Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7069

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Thanks Ken! I know what you mean by your university phase. I was there awhile back,but it seems sometimes the old phase calls out in a different way. For example, many would call the collecting of knives a phase from when men had need of such things for weaponry as well as for necessary everyday tools. For me both are as much about collecting things that are beautiful with excellent symmetry as it is about practicality.
Whatever! One collects and others just use. With my pens I do both...no Queen pens for me. They all get used regularly. Meanwhile my memoirs plug on.
Thanks for dropping by for a visit. Mate.
All the best
Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7070

  • DavidHamilton2
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Nice Pens. My Shaeffer PFM just went to the shop for repairs. Until it returns, I am stuck using only my Pelikan M800, or one of my many Parker 51's.;)
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Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7071

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JamesBell wrote:
Leo Thanks for sharing, what a wonderful collection, there beautiful.
I understand that each pen takes on a personality and touch of the writer.
Very nice !!
Thanks my friend! You are absolutely right. Each of my prize pens do take on a certain aura. Some have it right from the get go and they develop even more over time used. They do each have their own touch. The various nibs allow you a certain thickness of line and deliver the ink to the page with a greater or lesser wetness of line. They also allow you to feel the surface of the paper you are using, much as the steering of a fine sports car allows the driver to feel the surface of the road. Almost without exception they do require more skill and patience to use than a ball-point, but that is part of the experience that is wonderful and grows on you. Also it requires a different part of your brain than is usually used when writing with a keyboard or even a ball or roller point pen. Of course it is also more expensive when you factor in the bottles of ink. Some would call it a pain in the tuchas, I call it a kind of Zen experience that makes writing more pleasurable and meaningful.
Thanks for your comments James.

Warm regards
Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7072

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DavidHamilton2 wrote:
Nice Pens. My Shaeffer PFM just went to the shop for repairs. Until it returns, I am stuck using only my Pelikan M800, or one of my many Parker 51's.;)


Hi David
I know how you feel when one of your pens is in trouble. Still, the Pelikan M800 is not to be scoffed at.;) I hope your prize pen returns to you soon all fixed up!

Best regards mate :)
Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7108

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Somebody sent me a PM and wanted to know the cost of some of the pens I posted. Let me first give you the prices of the knives I posted, then I will compare. The F-S Commando Knife was custom made by Peter Parkinson in New Zealand at a cost of 395 US dollars. After the the shipping and duties, taxes and bank costs for the money transfer, it was over 550 dollars. The Bravo1 from Bark River with Spalted Maple grip was 289 US dollars and the BR Gunny Desert Ironwood scales right below it was 230 US dollars. Remembering that..." the pen is mightier than the sword." or knife if you will...the blue pen was $575 US dollars, the Afrika which is the very pretty one with the swirly pattern cost me $350 US and the red resin pen was 321 US dollars. So one picks one's poison. I feel no worse about paying those prices for pens than I did for thee knives. I wanted them so I paid the price. Who's to say silly Leo for buying those expensive pens or knives. I use the pens regularly more than I do the knives and using them is satisfying and a pleasure. Knives are good and so are pens! Yes? ;)

Cheers
Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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Re: Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7122

  • mark76
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Hey Leo,

Those are truely beautiful pens! They almost make me think whether I don’t collect the wrong things… I sure hope they bring out the best In your writening abilities.

I recognize very well what you say about your brains working differently when you write with a pen, compared to a word processor. I have written two books in my life. The first one (which eventually wasn’t published…) with a pen. My writing style back then was completely different from what it is now. You have to make up your mind up front, you cannot just type away and edit later. I wrote the second one on a word processor. That sort of seems to make your life easier. But really, I think it doesn’t. Or maybe it does. Editing is easier, but there’s less pressure to state exactly what you want the first time (or even second time) right. It can make life easier for a perfectionist, but I don’t know whether that is better. How’s that for you?

Great that you’re writing your memoirs! My grandfather wrote his a long time ago. He gave me the book when I was 18. Even now, I find it a fascinating read. How much times have changed. But also how much human beings have remained the same. And he was a wise old man I still learn from… I’m pressing my father into writing his memoirs as well. Unfortunately he says he’s not up to that. Maybe those genes just skip a generation. I that case your grandson Owen will love it!
Last Edit: 1 year 9 months ago by mark76.
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Re: Renaissance in Writing! 1 year 9 months ago #7125

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Good to hear from you Mark.
Using a fountain pen makes seems to make my writing more precise and clear. This may be rationalization on my part, but one thing is certain, writing with a fountain pen and in my own handwriting, makes me feel really good. The result is more satisfying to me and so I guess that the money spent for a pen that makes me feel that good, is money well spent.
Writing memoirs is a very daunting task and I don't blame your father for backing away from it. At the same time that it is arduous, it opens up whole banks of memories that have been relegated to the dusty old filing draws of the brain, and remembering them once more and reliving them so to speak is fascinating, even the ones that bring up old heart-breaks and actions that were less than correct. ;)
Very nice of you to drop by for a chat my friend. Anytime Mark!

Best regards chum
Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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