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TOPIC: Caring for your exotic wood knife handles

Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 6 months 3 weeks ago #15855

  • leomitch
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It depends on what you need. If the wood is not subjected to weather extremes or harsh treatment then I think Leo's Vaseline butter makes excellent sense. If the knife or gun stock is used in conditions where it is rained upon, dragged through mud and snow, and in the case of a knife in particular, which is being washed over and over again, I think Tom's formula with the penetrating oils is the better of the two. The Finnish army thinks pretty highly of that 1/3 mix i.e. a third each of bee's wax, boiled linseed oil and turpentine. As I said, you can easily use those proportions and make your own really hardy stuff.
Did I misinterpret your post Mark? :)

Leo
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Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 6 months 3 weeks ago #15858

  • LeoBarr
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The butter as said is for cutting boards that are often sanitised with weak chemicals and always rinsed off I would imagine a chopping board gets more exposure to soaps, water, blood etc so in effect I would imagine that the boards go through a lot more than a handle the idea is to keep saturating it eventually will not absorb any more .
Linseed oil, terps, wax etc is more like a varnish so it will seal once dry the downside I would imagine is that once the surface is sealed it will not allow the wood to take up any more so in my view the mineral oil & beeswax blended to that of a butter will allow a more constant flow of both the wax & mineral oil into the wood time after time eventually making the wood more durable.
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Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 6 months 3 weeks ago #15859

  • leomitch
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Without trying to be argumentative at all ;) , I will submit that the instructions on the Tom's Mix encourages the user to reapply as needed. Too, the military not only in Finland but also other countries and shooters of note use the stuff, so I guess my question would be, why add the linseed oil and turps if it is not necessary.It could be that it is not necessary to redo the wood as often. IMO it is hardier but not necessarily better quality then the Vaseline Butter, just lasts longer. I also think it seals to a certain extent when the Tom's is used, but is by no means everlasting. I don't know about your knives, especially when used daily as I do around the kitchen, are regularly and scrupulously washed, just not in a dishwasher, which for any wood is overkill.

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Leo
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Leo James Mitchell
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Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 6 months 3 weeks ago #15862

  • LeoBarr
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I think it will be whatever one is happier with the mineral oil & beeswax whilst I would not eat it is meant for a board whereas the turpentine would not be so palatable. I clean my knives by letting hot tap water run over the blade and then wipe dry I use two or three knives so they get rinsed as I go along so the handle normally stays dry and yet once again it depends on how you like to clean your knives.
I only put forward the mineral oil beeswax mix as a consideration. The fact that it is easy to make it is possible to play with the proportions ; the mineral oil is good for boards since it does not go rancid like sunflower or olive oil or produce allergies that nut oils can do.
I find that less processed things are preferable since there tends not to be a bundle of chemicals in it rather like homemade food as opposed to store prepared foods.
Since the mineral oil and beeswax is quite cheap to produce and can also be used on a boards this is primarily what it is for; it has more use to me but perhaps if you do have wooden tops or boards it would be worth making some and try it on the knife handles.
I have not used any of the products you mention to me they sound closer to old fashioned wood varnishes which maybe more suited to handles that get soaked in hot soapy water.
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Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 6 months 3 weeks ago #15866

  • mark76
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Thanks guys! (No, you interpreted my post very well, Leo ;) ). I'll do some experiments with boiled linseed oil and beeswax. If you happen to be able to read Dutch, here is a page about what "boiled linseed oil" really is... more than boiled linseed oil: www.hout-olie.nl/contents/nl/d277_verrij...kookte_lijnolie.html
Last Edit: 6 months 3 weeks ago by mark76.
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Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 6 months 3 weeks ago #15870

  • leomitch
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Hmmm! No I don't read Dutch, I just play at it using Google Translate! ;) I look forward to hearing the results of your experiments with, 'boiled linseed oil' whatever it may be. LOL!
Later mate!
Leo
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Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 5 months 1 week ago #16632

  • mark76
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leomitch wrote:
No I don't read Dutch, I just play at it using Google Translate! ;)

I only just discovered it's a very good site with the pros and cons of many types of oil. www.hout-olie.nl/ Maybe give Google Translate another chance.

A very brief summary:
  • Boiled linseed oil is a traditional very good wood protector and improver. It is, well, boiled linseed oil with a number of additives to make it penetrate the wood better. Very good protection, but makes the wood slightly yellowish. It does not make the wood shiny. Use a wax after impregnation.
  • Tung oil is similar to linseed oil, but perhaps even better. It gives less of a yellow shine to the wood and brings out the drawing of the wood very well. It also does not make the wood shiny.
  • Danish oil is a mixture that contains various oils. It impregnates wood as good as boiled linseed oil and improved tung oil, but brings out the drawing in the wood even better. It also makes the wood a bit shiny. No need to use a wax afterwards. Danish oil is recommended by the website for wood that is used indoors and that you want to get shiny.
  • And Bankirai oil, hard wood oil, hard wax oil, improved wood oil, impregnation oil, colour oil, teak oil, turpentine oil and white spiril oil ...

I just ordered a bottle of Danish oil. When I get to it, I'll post some pics to compare linseed oil to Danish oil.

And I happened to stumble upon some pics of a knife handle treated with Tung oil the other day. Good stuff! :cheer:
Last Edit: 5 months 1 week ago by mark76.
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Caring for your exotic wood knife handles 5 months 1 week ago #16638

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An excellent and useful post Mark! Thanks for that. :)

Leo
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Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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