Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
Welcome to the Wicked Edge forum!

Tell us and our members who you are, what you like and why you became a member of this site.
We welcome all new members and hope to see you around a lot!
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2

TOPIC: Newb Dude

Newb Dude 5 months 4 days ago #17184

  • BobNash
  • BobNash's Avatar
  • NOW ONLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 165
  • Thank you received: 63
  • Karma: 84
tcmeyer wrote:
Call Wicked Edge on Monday and I'm sure that they will help you out immediately.

+1 - they'll get you set up
Some of the edges I've sharpened on the WE
www.oldawan.com
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
505-570-2040 (mobile and office)
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Newb Dude 5 months 4 days ago #17191

  • Warthog
  • Warthog's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: 0
Sounds great. I took your advice and put an old Rambo type cap knife on the WE. It came out better than I anticipated for my first try.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Newb Dude 5 months 4 days ago #17192

  • EamonMcGowan
  • EamonMcGowan's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 525
  • Thank you received: 200
  • Karma: 29
Yeah I have to agree don't let that stop you from using the WE. Position the knife with about an inch of it in front of the clamp. This will be close enough to get you going. Then as Leo said at least 10 - 12 knives to break in the stones. The first two make knives just make sure you do not care about them! And then scrub away with the stones.
Then when you get your guide you can come back and refine your technique.
This set up actually works best when you have some wear and tear on the stones! The diamonds really need to break in. Then you will no doubt get those Holy Sh88 edges you dream about!
Oh and by the way welcome to a great forum. The fellows on here are very helpful and are very willing to answer your questions. Don't think your questions are to dumb to ask? We all had to start out with out first knives too. But not to worry the learning curve is really quick!
And most importantly remember to always have fun!! :woohoo:
The definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over again and expect a different result?
An old Irish toast, May the wind always be at your back, may you always have work and may you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows your dead. Cheers!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Newb Dude 5 months 4 days ago #17201

  • tcmeyer
  • tcmeyer's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 289
  • Thank you received: 234
  • Karma: 23
I misplaced my alignment guide a while back when I moved my sharpening station, and promptly forgot what it was called. I haven't missed it enough to do an earnest search for it, as its only use is to help you repeat the same sharpening position for each knife when they come back for the next service. But that's not much help unless you're keeping a record or log-book for each knife.

If you check out the Knife Database under the Resource pull-down menu, you'll see that most of the guys have recorded a position on the alignment guide for each knife. Being an old, scatter-brained, disorganized, walking human trash basket, I've chosen to forgo good sense and rather to key on some fixed, identifiable feature of the blade. For folding knives (80-90% of my sharpening), I always put the blade spine flat on the pins in the upper position and always with the bolster up against the vise. I just did a Case Old Timer which was my dad's, given to me on Easter by my soon-to-be 96-year-old mother. The shape and length of the blade didn't seem to fit my normal formula, so I indexed it with the top of the clip even with the far edge of the vise. For my Spyderco Delica, I align the forward edge of the thumbhole with the front edge of the vise.

The Old Timer and the Spyderco are both examples of something you'll come across on this forum: FFG - Full Flat Ground, meaning that the primary grind angle extends all the way to the spine. The sectional view of such blades is that of a triangle. This will present a problem the first time it pops up for you as there are no parallel faces to clamp on, but there are several ways to deal with it. I choose to clamp the blade flat against the left jaw face, and swing the right jaw face out until it is parallel to the other side of the blade. This method leans the Old Timer 3.0 degrees to the left, and you need to adjust your stone angles accordingly. This will be only one example of the beautiful flexibility of the WE system you have to look forward to.

Remember that having a secure purchase on the blade is crucial. Some use bits of chamois. I use about one sq. inch of a blue Scott paper Shop Towel.

Have great fun!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Newb Dude 5 months 3 days ago #17205

  • Warthog
  • Warthog's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: 0
Thanks everyone for this info. You've got me up and going, even without the guide. I will probably still try to get one, but I've already used it on 3 knives. The last one a large, inexpensive chefs knife. The results on this knife were incredible. Thanks again.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2
Time to create page: 0.132 seconds