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TOPIC: Interesting video... do you destress your edge?

Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 2 weeks ago #15867

  • CliffStamp
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In general what I post is meant to be shared, I have an academic background, I would just appreciate a reference to the original source material.

In regards to HT, etc. it is a really large and expansive issue, there are entire books wrote on it (many). I would not have a problem looking at wiki articles.

If anyone wants a decent background and has the time/inclination, then Verhoeven's metallurgy book is very nice as it is made specifically for knife makers.
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 2 weeks ago #15868

  • leomitch
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" I would not have a problem looking at Wiki articles." Cliff

That is good to hear Cliff. It is quite clear that you have an academic background,so we need your skills to help add commentary to threads that are put in the Wiki to help clarify any arcane and abstruse references that would help us all to understand things clearly.
Someone will no doubt be in touch with you about this. You will not be alone nor will there be tsunamis of extra time expected for your part.Just some general comments to extract what is important from threads going into the Wiki in your area of expertise.
Having said all of that, I suspect Clay will be on to you as well as others to discuss how you might be able to help.

Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 1 week ago #16036

  • Geocyclist
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First of all thanks to Cliff for all you input here. :cheer:

I did this for the first time today, destressed a S30V Benchmade mini Ritter grip. Normally the idea of destressing a nice edge would make me shutter. Plus the fact that it will take more time to get it sharp again. This blade was dull enough that I figured it couldn't get any worse.

I used a broken ceramic stick to destress. I started of with 600 diamonds, which I think I would have needed anyway without destressing given the dullness of this knife. The end result was amazing, definitely sharper that the initial edge. And I don't think it added much more sharpening time.

I think I will do this in the future when ever I have to "resharpen" where use of diamond stones is required. I have been able to "touch up" edges in with just ceramics and get good results if I didn't let the knife get too dull.
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 1 week ago #16043

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The thing that puts most people off is actually cutting into the stone which sets off abuse flags. However all you are removing is damaged steel which you would not want to form an edge on anyway as it is severely weak and brittle.

You can see this on a macroscopic scale if you just take a spoon and bend it back and forth until it breaks. Now look at the area right next to the break. It will be obvious that the damage extends beyond the immediate break.

Similar with a knife, the damage from blunting is beyond the immediate and if you keep forming an edge into this damaged material you will often never see the actual ability of the steel.
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 1 week ago #16045

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A very clear and concise answer Cliff. I winced the first time I tried this, but you are right...my next edge was the best yet.

Leo
Never go anywhere without your knife!
Gibbs rule number 9

Leo James Mitchell
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 1 week ago #16065

  • razoredgeknives
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CliffStamp wrote:
The thing that puts most people off is actually cutting into the stone which sets off abuse flags. However all you are removing is damaged steel which you would not want to form an edge on anyway as it is severely weak and brittle.

You can see this on a macroscopic scale if you just take a spoon and bend it back and forth until it breaks. Now look at the area right next to the break. It will be obvious that the damage extends beyond the immediate break.

Similar with a knife, the damage from blunting is beyond the immediate and if you keep forming an edge into this damaged material you will often never see the actual ability of the steel.

Clay, would it not be semi easy to track stress issues from "bending" the edge back and forth as you use and strop it via your microscope at 1600x? I think This would be cool to have a visual on and it may go to quiet those who disagree (if any)...
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 6 days ago #16114

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razoredgeknives wrote:
CliffStamp wrote:
The thing that puts most people off is actually cutting into the stone which sets off abuse flags. However all you are removing is damaged steel which you would not want to form an edge on anyway as it is severely weak and brittle.

You can see this on a macroscopic scale if you just take a spoon and bend it back and forth until it breaks. Now look at the area right next to the break. It will be obvious that the damage extends beyond the immediate break.

Similar with a knife, the damage from blunting is beyond the immediate and if you keep forming an edge into this damaged material you will often never see the actual ability of the steel.

Clay, would it not be semi easy to track stress issues from "bending" the edge back and forth as you use and strop it via your microscope at 1600x? I think This would be cool to have a visual on and it may go to quiet those who disagree (if any)...

I can try to get something started when I get back in town next week. Any suggestions on how to design the experiment?
--Clay Allison
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 5 months 5 days ago #16130

  • razoredgeknives
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Well I would suggest one of your *perfect edges* (.125 cbn mirror finish) that way it will be easier for us to see what's going on. Then take something that is as hard as the knife you are working with (like a smooth butchers steel) and very lightly run your edge perpendicular over the steel, in a scraping motion - This should essentially make a burr on one side as it rolls the steel of the very edge. Basically we just need some way to get the steel to roll, but not too much so that way the strop can straighten it back out.
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Interesting video... do you destress your edge? 4 months 4 weeks ago #16265

  • CliffStamp
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Clay,

Just as a side note, since all microscopes use vastly different meanings of magnification, could you put a simple linear magnification note in pictures, it is fairly trivial to do even without software (even though I don't do it all the time). Most scopes often claim very high powers (400-500+X) but the actual linear magnification can be as low as 100X.

That being said, as I have said before, if you ever have the time/inclination I would appreciate a video where you show just taking a few pictures as your pictures are extremely clear and detailed. Compared to what is often posted (mine included) it is like comparing something like the WE to a flea-market jigger/system.
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