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TOPIC: Leading or Trailing Strokes

Re: Leading or Trailing Strokes 1 month 1 week ago #18454

  • razoredgeknives
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During some reading (HERE on pg 18 specifically) I found some interesting documentations regarding edge leading vs edge trailing sharpening... In this paper Dr. Verhoeven is comparing razor blades (specifically on pg. 18 I think it is a straight razor):

"All of the sharpening done on the waterstones moved the blade along the stone in
the direction into the blade edge [edge leading] causing the abrasive debris to move away from the edge.
It was theorized that moving in this direction would reduce the bur size at the edge by
preventing the debris from being deposited along the edge. To see if this theory was
supported by evidence an experiment was done on the 6000 grit waterstone where the 10
4-stroke cycles were all done with the blade edge moving away-from [edge trailing] rather than into the
stone surface. The results are shown in Fig. 27. Comparing Figs 25 and 27 one sees that
moving the blade away-from the edge, as in Fig. 27, does seem to produce a significantly
larger bur than moving it into the edge
, as in Fig. 25. The larger bur is also accompanied
by an increase in edge roughness, as shown in the face views."

you will have to view the paper so you can reference the photographs... thought this was interesting.
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Re: Leading or Trailing Strokes 1 month 1 week ago #18488

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razoredgeknives wrote:
During some reading .....

you will have to view the paper so you can reference the photographs... thought this was interesting.

Thanks for posting this. I'll finish reading it later today...

Is this what you read for leisure & entertainment? I do.

After watching The Woodrights Shop's explanation & demonstration of cross-cut and rip saws I've been re-reading the first two chapters of Leonard Lee's "The Complete Guide To Sharpening".

They are "The Meaning of Sharpness" and "The Physics of Cutting Wood Fibers"

"Unless you are living in a remote area, sharpening your own knives really does not make sense. The time consumed is usually out of all proportion to the money saved, and the end result is usually of lower quality than that you could expect from even a run-of-the-mill sharpening service. This is truly one area where equipment overwhelms technique by a substantial margin. If you do not have an excellent system for holding a blade straight and rigid, you will be in trouble from the opening gun."

Thanks for posting...
~~~~

For Now,

Gib

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"Things work out best for those who make the best out of the way things work out."

"My goal is to be a good, practical knife sharpener. My dream is to polish molecules."
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Re:Re: Re: Leading or Trailing Strokes 1 month 1 week ago #18489

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GibCurry wrote:
razoredgeknives wrote:
During some reading .....

you will have to view the paper so you can reference the photographs... thought this was interesting.

Thanks for posting this. I'll finish reading it later today...

Is this what you read for leisure & entertainment? I do.

After watching The Woodrights Shop's explanation & demonstration of cross-cut and rip saws I've been re-reading the first two chapters of Leonard Lee's "The Complete Guide To Sharpening".

They are "The Meaning of Sharpness" and "The Physics of Cutting Wood Fibers"

"Unless you are living in a remote area, sharpening your own knives really does not make sense. The time consumed is usually out of all proportion to the money saved, and the end result is usually of lower quality than that you could expect from even a run-of-the-mill sharpening service. This is truly one area where equipment overwhelms technique by a substantial margin. If you do not have an excellent system for holding a blade straight and rigid, you will be in trouble from the opening gun."

Thanks for posting...
Yeah I do read this type of thing because I enjoy it! Lol

The only thing I take issue with what you quoted from the show is that I think sharpening is easy with a little practice and can be done with minimal tools... Look up cliff stamp sharpening a knife on a brick to newsprint slicing sharpness
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Re:Re: Re: Leading or Trailing Strokes 1 month 1 week ago #18490

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razoredgeknives wrote:
Yeah I do read this type of thing because I enjoy it! Lol

The only thing I take issue with what you quoted from the show is that I think sharpening is easy with a little practice and can be done with minimal tools... Look up cliff stamp sharpening a knife on a brick to newsprint slicing sharpness

I concur. But, the quote about holding the blade rigid is one of the clues that led me to the Wicked Edge.

I don't necessarily agree with all Mr. Lee's conclusions or opinions but his "science" is interesting and entertaining to me.

"Sharpness for a cutting tool could be defined as two surfaces meeting at a line of zero width. That might be fine theory but could result in bad practice. To be effective, a cutting tool not only has to have an edge of zero width, but the angle at which the two surfaces meet must accommodate the intended use of the tool and the material from which the tool is made."

"Unlike wood, meat and soft vegetables have little rigidity to their structure. They are about 95% water held together with films and filaments of varying strengths. To cut them, you need an edge that will rend their fabric at very low applied pressure."

"The skin of a tomato is sufficiently tough that it will maintain its integrity in the face of pressure from a smooth knife edge. Of course, you can only apply relatively light pressure, otherwise you tend to squash the entire tomato. You will find that a less finely finished edge, one that has many fine serrations in it from a medium-grit abrasive (400x to 1200x) will cut into the tomato much more easily because it is better designed to tear apart a film and sever fibers. Although the desirable amount of serration varies, you want a bit of tooth on any blade used for soft vegetables, meats and bread.
"

Nothing new. Still interesting. (To me)....
~~~~

For Now,

Gib

Φ

"Things work out best for those who make the best out of the way things work out."

"My goal is to be a good, practical knife sharpener. My dream is to polish molecules."
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