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TOPIC: New blog post

New blog post 9 months 3 weeks ago #14317

  • mark76
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I wrote a new blog entry, on flattening waterstones. Of course based on a recent discussion here.

Enjoy!
Last Edit: 9 months 3 weeks ago by mark76.
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New blog post 9 months 3 weeks ago #14330

  • DAUG
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Thank you for that info, very useful indeed!
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New blog post 9 months 3 weeks ago #14335

  • LeoBarr
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Thank you for that I also think that if for instance one allows a stone to dish before lapping especially on the higher grits the stone is counter productive particularly when the idea is to achieve a flat bevel and especially on a fixed angle tool like the WE . Possible it is not quite as important on benchstones when creating convex bevels ; but it is depressing to see lots of stone been removed when lapping .
I lapp my stones after use every time I use them ; it means it is only necessary to give them a couple of passes so it is quickly done this also obligates the need for something that is suitable for that grit as Clay has shown.
The lower grit stones are not nearly as important to lapp since they will be superseded by higher grits .
I have one 24 grit stone that since I use it to change the shape of the blade so the cutting edge is perpendicular to the stone this particular stone is almost better not lapped.
But the Choseras on the WE start at a medium grit which should be lapped regularly .
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New blog post 9 months 3 weeks ago #14341

  • EamonMcGowan
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Mark,
Very nice! you got to the point quick and I enjoyed your style.
Eamon
The definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over again and expect a different result?
An old Irish toast, May the wind always be at your back, may you always have work and may you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows your dead. Cheers!
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New blog post 9 months 3 weeks ago #14359

  • Geocyclist
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Great post. Thanks. Glad to see this topic investigated scientifically.

For anyone reading this Mark has some really good posts on his blog, besides this one. If you are serious he has some serious information. All are informative and based on actual tests. :cheer:
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New blog post 9 months 2 weeks ago #14451

  • Geocyclist
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Bumping this up again. Thanks again Mark.

I pulled out my water stones (Chosera) last night. I marked them with pencil and used the 1000 WE diamonds. The 400 had significant dishing. Not too bad, but it took more than I expected to flatten it. The 1000 diamonds work fine and the pencil mark trick works perfectly. Even my 10k stones had some dishing, but 3-5 strokes got them flat.

I think I only have 10+ knives sharpened on the Chosera's , so my advice to the forum is:
- check and flatten your water stones. They dish more quickly than you think
- the 1000 diamonds work well
- the stones work better after flattening, I could feel the 400 was a little more aggressive and all of them felt smoother
- I think you don't really shorten the life, you are just taking down the end parts that are used much anyway. (stop as soon as you get the pencil marks in the center gone). - My opinion, don't know if someone has more info.
- when you feel a little stiction you are done or very close to done

I don't sharpen a much as some of you guys here and was thinking my stones would go years before needing flattening. I am glad I checked.

Also of interest - I scrub my stones about 5 times together before sharpening to make a little slurry, I thought doing this would be enough to keep them flat, not true. Maybe more scrubbing would do it, but obviously I had some dishing.
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New blog post 9 months 2 weeks ago #14452

wonder how this applies to lapping the ceramic stones :)
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New blog post 9 months 2 weeks ago #14454

  • mark76
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SimarjeetSahni wrote:
wonder how this applies to lapping the ceramic stones :)

It happens I did a blog post on this... here :) .

Thanks a lot for your kind words, Geo! I completely agree with your remarks on the Chosera's. They require a little more care than the WE stock ceramic stones, but you get back a lot from them.
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